hoodbypussy:

Évolution inversée

“It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.”
― Pablo Picasso

(via mercurieux)

jeannepompadour:

Young Parisienne by Achile Deveria, 1824

jeannepompadour:

Young Parisienne by Achile Deveria, 1824

thebrainscoop:

thatssoscience:

Less “Big Bang Theory,” More Dana Scully: What It’s Going to Take to Lead More Girls Into Science
This article touches on the profound impact cultural icons have and the lack of icons for women in STEM fields today.

Dana Scully influenced generations of women (including me!). “The Scully Effect” inspired women to flock to fields typically dominated by men, like science and law enforcement, because of the bad ass role model Dana Scully was. The actress who played her, Gillian Anderson, knows of the effect her character had.

Anderson responded that she’s long been aware of the Scully Effect, and has frequently heard from girls “who were going into the medical world or the science world or the FBI world or other worlds that I reigned, that they were pursuing those pursuits because of the character of Scully.”

Yet Dana Scully is no where to be found now. Where Dana Scully once ruled we now have Penny on The Big Bang Theory who gets played for laughs as a “silly woman” among serious male scientists. (Don’t even get me started on the treatment of “nerds” and “scientists” on that show. Just listen to where the laugh track plays. They aren’t laughing with Sheldon, they are laughing AT him.)  
Emily Graslie said it best “There should be some woman on some show on some channel, I keep searching for her, and I don’t think she exists. There is no female equivalent of Brian Cox, Neil DeGrasse Tyson.”
While these men do great things for the image of science in the public eye, there is literally no female version, on scripted programs or otherwise. They aren’t there. So Emily, myself, and many others have had enough. We’ve taken matters into our hands.
If the 741,343 views on Emily’s video on the subject are any indication, I don’t think we are the only ones who are fed up. 
Read more at Yes Magazine

Some day soon we will have actual women scientists and engineers as positive role-models in the media, instead of having to settle for being inspired by fictional characters. 

thebrainscoop:

thatssoscience:

Less “Big Bang Theory,” More Dana Scully: What It’s Going to Take to Lead More Girls Into Science

This article touches on the profound impact cultural icons have and the lack of icons for women in STEM fields today.

Dana Scully influenced generations of women (including me!). “The Scully Effect” inspired women to flock to fields typically dominated by men, like science and law enforcement, because of the bad ass role model Dana Scully was. The actress who played her, Gillian Anderson, knows of the effect her character had.

Anderson responded that she’s long been aware of the Scully Effect, and has frequently heard from girls “who were going into the medical world or the science world or the FBI world or other worlds that I reigned, that they were pursuing those pursuits because of the character of Scully.”

Yet Dana Scully is no where to be found now. Where Dana Scully once ruled we now have Penny on The Big Bang Theory who gets played for laughs as a “silly woman” among serious male scientists. (Don’t even get me started on the treatment of “nerds” and “scientists” on that show. Just listen to where the laugh track plays. They aren’t laughing with Sheldon, they are laughing AT him.)  

Emily Graslie said it best “There should be some woman on some show on some channel, I keep searching for her, and I don’t think she exists. There is no female equivalent of Brian Cox, Neil DeGrasse Tyson.”

While these men do great things for the image of science in the public eye, there is literally no female version, on scripted programs or otherwise. They aren’t there. So Emily, myself, and many others have had enough. We’ve taken matters into our hands.

If the 741,343 views on Emily’s video on the subject are any indication, I don’t think we are the only ones who are fed up. 

Read more at Yes Magazine

Some day soon we will have actual women scientists and engineers as positive role-models in the media, instead of having to settle for being inspired by fictional characters. 

nothinglikethesun:

Stephane Gizard

nothinglikethesun:

Stephane Gizard

(Source: waxthevan, via veryspecialporn)

jtotheizzoe:

vfrankmd:

Debuting my new series with three new experiments.

_____________

Link to video -  http://pbly.co/FMDep1

Link to playlist - to.pbs.org/frankensteinmd

Website - http://frankensteinMD.com

Twitter - https://twitter.com/VFrankMD 

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/FrankensteinMD 

Instagram - http://instagram.com/FrankensteinMD 

Today’s the day! IT’S ALIVE!!

Meet Victoria :)

(via gender-and-science)

S. Melton Fisher - The black veil

(Source: marcuscrassus)

"‘They’re not flowers,’ said the pipe smoker…’At first it looks like petals, the heart of a flower, then one sees the two uneven lips, the fine center line, the wavelike edge of the lips, when they are spread open.’"

— Anais Nin, Delta of Venus  (via theperfumemaker)

wickedclothes:

Laser Projection Virtual Keyboard

Turn any surface into a keyboard. Using laser projection, this bluetooth keyboard can be used with most smartphones, as well as tablets and laptops. Sold on Brookstone.

(via peekadora)

wickedclothes:

Galaxy Pillows

Each of these cotton pillows feature a vivid image of a galaxy. Measuring 12” x 16”, they make a perfect accent for any room, or a bit of added comfort to your bed. Sold on Etsy.

(via peekadora)

erikkwakkel:

Medieval rockstar

The last page of a medieval book is usually a protective flyleaf, which is positioned between the actual text and the bookbinding. It was usually left blank and it therefore often filled up with pen trials, notes, doodles, or drawings. This addition I encountered today and it is not what you’d expect: a full-on drawing of a maiden playing the lute, which she holds just like a guitar. A peaceful smile shines on her face. I love this rockstar lady, so unexpectedly positioned at the end of the book, trying to catch the reader’s attention as he is closing it.

Pic: London, British Library, Sloane MS 554 (more here).

(via peekadora)